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Posts Tagged ‘evaluation’

I work with my institution’s international teaching assistant (ITA) program. The program, like those at many universities and colleges in the USA, is designed to provide language and pedagogical training to non-native English speaking graduate students who serve as teaching assistants for their departments.

Last fall, after testing all potential ITAs for oral proficiency training, our program received many concerned calls from departments whose international students did not meet the minimum English language standards to be TAs. In fact, a large number of the students were well below cut-off in the university’s policy regarding ITAs. Departments were concerned that these students needed funding and now they did not qualify to work as TAs due to their oral proficiency. To put it mildly was a very frustrating experience for many stakeholders.

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This holiday does not exist – at least not at any workplace where I have been employed – but I think it would be great. (more…)

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A few weeks ago, I posted a short description of my experience giving a mini-workshop on Technology for Language Teaching. I had tried to incorporate sound pedagogical research into my presentation, but based on audience participation and other non-verbal clues, I concluded that the teachers attending the session really just wanted me to demonstrate so “cool tools.” Ironically, this was the very attitude that I was trying to change with my presentation: I wanted teachers to see technology as a means to accomplishing existing curricular goals, rather than using a technology activity simply because it was neat (and possibly unrelated to the purposes of the course).

The program director collected evaluation feedback from the attendees, and their explicit feedback confirms my suspicions. Every form indicated that they wanted more demonstrations. Surprisingly, they did rate the session highly, though part of me thinks this was just because they were being polite.

In any case, should I be asked to give a similar presentation in the future, I will do a better job at demonstrating one or two “cool tools” but I will still stick to a message that insists that technology is only as good as the planning and teaching that it supports. Technology cannot replace good teaching/learning, but it can certainly enhance both.

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