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Posts Tagged ‘strategies’

Because my wife and I live in a rural development about 30 minutes south from where we work, we have taken to listening to audio books during our commute. For the most part, we have listened to young adult fiction (entertaining and never contains questionable content like adult fiction), but while I was at the public library one day, I picked up a copy of “Creating Disney Magic” by Lee Cockerell. We had just been to Orlando the month before, so I was curious to see what were the “secrets” behind Disney leadership strategies.

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Last week, I spent a half hour in the depths of the university library searching through the P/PE stacks (the call number section of linguistics and language teaching). I picked up a few books that I hadn’t read before, including this volume that focuses on language learning contexts in India and the Middle East.

Singh, G. (2006). Summarisation skills: An analysis in text comprehension and production. In V. Narang (Ed.), Contemporary Themes and Issues in Language Pedagogy (pp. 17-32). Delhi, India: Nagri Printers.

This chapter summarizes research (from the 1980s) on summarization skills, and then applies those concepts and methodologies to an analysis of summaries generated by graduate student English language students in India. The results suggest that even graduate students struggle to understand source texts and write effective summaries. (more…)

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Cohen is the first author from this volume whom I did not meet at LTRC this summer. However, I did email him with some questions in regards to this article and he was very prompt and helpful with his response. So in addition to helping me gain a better sense of language testing, the reading of this book is also helping me to gain a better sense of the language testing community.

Cohen, A. D. (2007). The coming of age for research on test-taking strategies. In J. Fox, M. Wesche, D. Bayliss, L. Cheng, and C. E. Turner (eds.), Language testing reconsidered (pp. 89-111). Ottawa, ON: University of Ottawa Press.

Cohen’s contribution to this book is language testing strategies. This is not surprising if you are familiar with Cohen’s extensive strategy work. I will admit that allow I use strategies in my teaching and I certainly discussed the topic in-depth with other language educators (especially when I was an MA TESOL student), I had never read anything by Cohen before. I was really excited by some of his comments in this chapter:

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